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Idealog's Most Creative: Freedom Kids' Rachel Hansen

Most Creative People

Idealog's Most Creative: Freedom Kids' Rachel Hansen

Rachel Hansen was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in retail for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Perplexed by the massive gender-divide in children's clothing, Hansen decided to do something about it and began offering kids an ethically-made alternative to the highly-gendered, factory-made clothes that dominate children’s clothing. So Freedom Kids was born and it’s grown up to be very popular indeed. Here, she talks finding inspiration, the ethos she works by and what success looks like.

Most Creative People

Deadly Ponies founder and Creative Director Liam Bowden was the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in fashion/footwear for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Bowden began making one-off leather pieces and jewellery in his garage. And now Deadly Ponies has become an internationally renowned leather accessories brand that has challenged traditional notions of design. And a recent collaboration with My Little Pony cemented its pop cultural cool factor. Here, he talks finding inspiration, where his best ideas come from and resilience.

Most Creative People

Pat Shepherd was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in social enterprise/charity for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. While many choose to support their favourite charities every now and then, Shepherd wants people to give regularly, ideally around 1% of their income every month. His charity One Percent Collective makes this easy, plus they publish The Generosity Journal, a magazine and website full of amazing stories and charitable folk contributing their time and talents. Here, he discusses creativity, lessons learnt and where he wants to go next.

Most Creative People

Auckland Council's design champion Ludo Campbell-Reid was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in government/politics/economics for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. A strong voice in real life and on social media for more human-centred urban design and development, more affordable, well-designed housing and more public spaces that think about people rather than cars, Campbell-Reid is playing an important role in ensuring Auckland residents get a better city. Here, he talks finding inspiration, the biggest lessons learnt and what he's working towards.

Most Creative People

The team at Sharesies was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in money for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Sharesies is an online platform democratising investment and was founded by a team of 7 starting off with the typical start-up story of wanting to solve a founders problem. Sonya Williams was keen to invest in small chunks but had no way of getting started. She chatted to Leighton Roberts as he started an investment club when he was 17 and the team was formed to bring Sharesies to life. After working at a bank, Sharesies CEO Brooke Anderson, saw firsthand how bad Kiwis were with saving and how little people knew about investing so jumped at the opportunity to co-found a business that would help them with it – even if they only had a small amount of money to invest. Brooke recently won the Pitch Like A Girl at RISE conference in Hong Kong for Sharesies. Here, the team talk creativity, finding inspiration and the secret to resilience.

Most Creative People

Rush Digital's Danu Abeysuriya was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in digital/data for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Abeysuriya is one of the rare few tech gurus around who can explain big, hairy concepts like computer vision in layman’s terms. He founded his own digital engineering company, Rush Digital, at the tender age of 24 and has since worked with the likes of Microsoft, Samsung and Heineken to bring big creative ideas to life through digital technology. Here, he talks what makes him creative, finding inspiration and where his best ideas come from.

Most Creative People

Aliesha Staples was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in film/TV for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Staples got in on the AR/VR bandwagon early and is now creating some pioneering experiences with the technology, including helping develop a fire-resistant 360-degree camera for a VR experience for New Zealand Fire and Emergency. It also filmed New Zealand’s first live stream in 360 VR Video and it’s pushing boundaries in health, letting children experience procedures through VR to prepare them for the real thing. Not only that, her company also operates a successful rental business to give people access to these new technologies. Here, she talks creativity, expansion and the secret to success.

Most Creative People

Dropit's Brendan and Peter Howell were one of our People's Choice winners for the digital and data category in Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. The Mount Maunganui locals and brothers are the founders of a reverse auction app called Dropit, which aims to help solve the problem of fan disengagement at sports games by auctioning off items and dropping the prices during a 60-second countdown. It since scooped a distribution deal in the US, as well as being valued at US$30 million. Here, they talk creativity, what's unique about 'Kiwiness' on a world stage and finding inspiration.

Most Creative People

Gina Kiel was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in art/photography for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Kiel’s bright, bold and beautiful abstract illustrative art has struck a chord, with her work featuring on everything from the new Mac’s Sweet Disposition beer to the garage doors of trendy production houses to a Fat Freddy’s Drop album cover to a bespoke Audi. Here, she talks where her best ideas come from, the secret to success and what gets her up in the morning.

Most Creative People

oDocs CEO Hong Sheng Chiong was one of the People's Choice winners for the health category in Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Sheng Chiong and Hannah Eastvold-Edwins from oDocs are turning iPhones into eye clinics to prevent people from losing their vision. What previously required expensive equipment and was out of reach of millions who were in danger of losing their sight is now accessible, showing the brilliance of basic solutions that harness the amazing technology that is all around us. Here, he talks creativity, the secret to success and where his best ideas come from.