Crowd-sourced taxi service Uber hitches its wagon to restaurant app Zomato

Taxi-booking service Uber has integrated its service with the Zomato restaurant search and discovery app, offering hungry punters a convenient way to make their dinner date.

The highly logical match was announced last week and is already live in Auckland and Wellington, along with 26 other cities across 13 countries, including India, Australia and the UK.

The partnership means that Zomato users to will be able to book an Uber cab (a crowd-sourced taxi service) to the restaurant they are planning to visit directly from within the Zomato app.

Image: Uber

The announcement follows closely Zomato’s acquisition of NexTable, a US-based restaurant reservations and table-management platform, and a successful round of fundraising that saw the company valued at more than a billion dollars.

"We are delighted to be expanding the scope of our partnership with Zomato," says Uber Head of Business-Asia, Eric Alexander. "Across six continents, Uber allows riders to connect with their cities in new ways. Through this API integration, Zomato users in 13 countries will now be able to reach those hidden gems in their cities seamlessly and in style".

Speaking about the new feature, Pankaj Chaddah, Co-Founder and COO of Zomato, said, “We're constantly looking for ways to make every meal, for everyone, a great experience. This partnership makes eating out more convenient with the Zomato app connecting to Uber services seamlessly.”

Once a user has found a restaurant using the Zomato app, a single tap on the Uber button on the restaurant page will find the nearest Uber driver. The user then receives an estimate of the fair and how long it will take for the driver to arrive.

Uber launched in New Zealand last year and is currently available in more than 200 cities worldwide. The service has spawned a host of imitators, who, copying Uber’s highly successful business model, similarly offer services based on the aggregation on consumer demand via mobile device, a process known as Uberification