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The Idealog + Blunt + Generator Umbrella Experiment: The top 10 People’s Choice winners

Did you enter (and/or vote!) in the Idealog + Blunt + Generator Umbrella Experiment? Good on you. The four finalists and People’s Choice winner will be announced in early April when our Design Issue debuts. But everyone hates waiting. So here are the top 10 People’s Choice winners.

1. The Land We Are

JY Hew

"New Zealand’s landscapes are both just as marvellous and diverse as it’s people. Using the landscape as a medium, this design represents the culmination of NZ’s different people and cultures.

The land is something that binds us to Aotearoa. It has enabled us to accomplish wonders far beyond what others could envisage as we constantly draw upon it for inspiration resulting in truly bespoke design that could only have been conceived here.

We are fortunate to live in a country where we can gaze upon the stars, traverse across Middle-earth and enjoy the life’s simple pleasures in our own backyard."

2. Geometric NZ

Laura Cibilich

"Inspired by traditional Māori and Pacific patterns, brought together in a modern way, this design also features a lot of black, linking to our affinity with the colour."

3. Sandy Kiwi Dogos

Daniel Ido

"At the moment, I'm living in London and we just had the London Waitangi Day pub crawl and whilst having a nice walk down the old London streets (mildly drunk), surrounded by at least 3,000 kiwis dressed up to the brim, reminded me of what i'm nostalgic about in New Zealand; a pie, sand, hokey pokey ice-cream, and even the scent of sunblock. This artwork was I guess inspired by that; things that I would consider part of the modern day culture of New Zealand as of 2018, certain memes and neo-pop-culture things that are absolutely normal to us back in New Zealand, but something I crack up about (more so) now that I'm in a foreign place. My design incorporates a bunch of dogs in New Zealand, wearing some new icons, some old classics, and some meme-worthy items. And there's also a cat. The umbrella colour is a take-on of old Japanese umbrellas, yet takes on a nice sandy colour which is reminiscent of something we all want... with a passion... in the wet, cold, INSUFFERABLE dread of winter; hopefully inspiring a little bit of nostalgia and a reminder of what's to come when your dripping wet in one of Auckland's spontaneous rain showers."

4. Circle of Love

Ellie Compton

"Circle of Love illustrates a whimsical cross-section of the sometimes ridiculous and hilarious nature of love in society. From Swiping Right to Love Shacks - From churches to wolf whistling at construction sites - our experiences with love shape who we are and often help us understand each other."

5. Te Reo of Flowers

Christine van Hoffen

"As New Zealanders, our connection with the land is undeniable. More than just a source of sustenance and shelter, our relationship with nature is woven deep throughout Māori mythology and storytelling. When the British arrived to colonize the country in the Victorian Era, they brought with them other non-native plants, as well as a penchant to ascribe symbolic meaning to each - this is referred to as the "Victorian Language of Flowers".

Each plant represented in this design has been hand-picked (pun fully intended) for its symbolic meaning in either Maori culture/storytelling, or for its Victorian Flower Language meaning. They were selected based on the characteristics I personally use to describe New Zealand, along with those I believe the rest of the world would apply to our country. Outstretched hands have been incorporated to illustrate the act of give and take that constantly occurs when multiple cultures combine to create a modern society.

NZ-Native plants with Maori Significance: - Silver Fern/Ponga: Strength, Enduring Power, Resistance. A symbol of our homeland and a guiding light leading us home. Also heavily collected by Victorian travelers for display. - Flax/Harakeke (flowers): Family bonds/relationships - Cabbage Tree/ Tī Kōuka (flowers): Independence - Pōhutukawa : Spirituality - Mānuka: Plays an important role in forest regeneration, nurturing the next generation of plants as they grow. Also of vital significance for early Māori - with many uses as food, medicine, and tool-making.

Introduced plants with Victorian Flower Meanings: - Poppy: Remembrance and victory (included as a nod to ANZAC) - Queen Anne's Lace: Sanctuary - Nasturtium: Patriotism, Charity, Love - Jasmine: Purity."

6.  Ngahere Pārūrū

Chris Hutchinson

"An array of hybridised ferns, greenery and creepy critters coil into a humid arrangement of native South Pacific flora and fauna. The dense texture and pattern drawing your peering spheres forward to see what new fronds they might discover amongst the undergrowth.

Lift the forest skyward and let the rainwater nourish new growth."

7. blooming 'brella

Bonnie Brown

"At first glance this might just look like a fun floral print, but there are elements woven into the piece that reference the history of Aotearoa (as you can see in the snapshots). Much like New Zealand’s design identity the flowers in this print are growing, changing and being influenced by both the past and the present. That and its low key - looks like your grandmas retro wallpaper, so that's cool too."

8. Rain buddy 2

Sam Baker

"Happy friends to keep you company during rainy days."

9. Tui in a Puka

Guy Harkness

"'Tui in a Puka' is a simple scene featuring two beautiful icons on NZ's flora and fauna."

10. Te Reo of Flowers - Black & White Version

Christine van Hoffen

"As New Zealanders, our connection with the land is undeniable. More than just a source of sustenance and shelter, our relationship with nature is woven deep throughout Māori mythology and storytelling. When the British arrived to colonize the country in the Victorian Era, they brought with them other non-native plants, as well as a penchant to ascribe symbolic meaning to each - this is referred to as the "Victorian Language of Flowers".

Each plant represented in this design has been hand-picked (pun fully intended) for its symbolic meaning in either Maori culture/storytelling, or for its Victorian Flower Language meaning. They were selected based on the characteristics I personally use to describe New Zealand, along with those I believe the rest of the world would apply to our country. Outstretched hands have been incorporated to illustrate the act of give and take that constantly occurs when multiple cultures combine to create a modern society.

NZ-Native plants with Maori Significance: - Silver Fern/Ponga: Strength, Enduring Power, Resistance. A symbol of our homeland and a guiding light leading us home. Also heavily collected by Victorian travelers for display. - Flax/Harakeke (flowers): Family bonds/relationships - Cabbage Tree/ Tī Kōuka (flowers): Independence - Pōhutukawa : Spirituality - Mānuka: Plays an important role in forest regeneration, nurturing the next generation of plants as they grow. Also of vital significance for early Māori - with many uses as food, medicine, and tool-making.

Introduced plants with Victorian Flower Meanings: - Poppy: Remembrance and victory (included as a nod to ANZAC) - Queen Anne's Lace: Sanctuary - Nasturtium: Patriotism, Charity, Love - Jasmine: Purity."

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***** Check out the rest of the entries here. *****

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Thanks to everyone who entered!

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