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Exploration

New heights, new depths: James Cameron on the future of deep-sea exploration

New heights, new depths

New heights, new depths: James Cameron on the future of deep-sea exploration

From the dawn of time, the urge to explore has always been in humankind’s nature, propelling us forward to new discoveries, new experiences and new frontiers. Many years ago, humans migrated out from the temperate plains of Africa to traverse unknown lands and embarking on such a conquest helped society evolve. But come 2018, much of the world is within plain sight – a quick search on Google Maps can enlighten anyone as to what the Pyramids of Giza or Mount Everest look like. However, many believe there are two frontiers yet to be properly explored and developed: the deep ocean and deep space. In part one, we talk film maker and deep-sea explorer James Cameron about new frontiers, new technology and what he's planning on exploring next.

Space oddities

Retired astronaut Chris Hadfield - in New Zealand for IBM Think - chats with Idealog about what role small nations like New Zealand can play in space exploration and the space industry, how technology is changing space exploration, how private businesses are disrupting things, a technology that has really surprised him, and more.