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Most Creative People

Most Creative People

Dropit's Brendan and Peter Howell were one of our People's Choice winners for the digital and data category in Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. The Mount Maunganui locals and brothers are the founders of a reverse auction app called Dropit, which aims to help solve the problem of fan disengagement at sports games by auctioning off items and dropping the prices during a 60-second countdown. It since scooped a distribution deal in the US, as well as being valued at US$30 million. Here, they talk creativity, what's unique about 'Kiwiness' on a world stage and finding inspiration.

Most Creative People

Gina Kiel was one of the People's Choice winners for Most Creative in art/photography for Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Kiel’s bright, bold and beautiful abstract illustrative art has struck a chord, with her work featuring on everything from the new Mac’s Sweet Disposition beer to the garage doors of trendy production houses to a Fat Freddy’s Drop album cover to a bespoke Audi. Here, she talks where her best ideas come from, the secret to success and what gets her up in the morning.

Most Creative People

oDocs CEO Hong Sheng Chiong was one of the People's Choice winners for the health category in Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Sheng Chiong and Hannah Eastvold-Edwins from oDocs are turning iPhones into eye clinics to prevent people from losing their vision. What previously required expensive equipment and was out of reach of millions who were in danger of losing their sight is now accessible, showing the brilliance of basic solutions that harness the amazing technology that is all around us. Here, he talks creativity, the secret to success and where his best ideas come from.

Most Creative People

Jay Goodey was one of the People's Choice winners for the retail category in Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. Goodey was just 22 when he quit his job as a television editor to launch Onceit, an online store where retailers can sell their outlet stock and consumers can get a bargain. The membership-only site has grown like topsy, it has embraced the bricks and clicks trend with a pop-up store in Newmarket, it now handles over 20,000 orders a month across premium apparel, homewares and beauty. Once It differs from most online retailers in that it doesn't hold most of its stock at a warehouse and send items quickly. Instead, it holds sales on behalf of brands, shooting campaigns, processing orders, and sending items out once they arrive. Here, he talks creativity, resilience and finding your best ideas.

Most Creative People

Indigo and Wills Rowe were one of the People's Choice winners for the manufacturing category in Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. The Marlborough-based duo run a design and art social enterprise called the Paper Rain Project that creates, among many things, longboards made out of recycled wine barrels. The boards are sold mainly as artworks, but there are also plans in the works to develop a rideable eucalyptus board for commuters. Here, they talk creativity, resilience and bringing an ethos into your craft.

Most Creative People

Jamie Beaton was one of the People's Choice winners for the education category in Idealog and Accenture's Most Creative People. You don’t create a company valued at $220 million in your early 20s unless you have something special, and the mile a minute whizzkid Beaton has done that with Crimson Education, which helps students from around the world get into top US universities. Here, he talks why some creative passions shouldn't be a full-time gig, resilience and how to tell a good idea from a bad one.