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Is this the future of creativity? AKQA and Google team up to create machine learning art

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Is this the future of creativity? AKQA and Google team up to create machine learning art

Technology is infiltrating the creative sector in a big way. How will it change the processes of artwork, and how can creativity be taught to machines? It’s these questions AKQA and Google set out to answer with the creation of Somesthetic Transfer, an AI machine that takes the texture of pre-existing artwork, digitises it and applies it to another artistic project in a way a human wouldn’t have visualised it. AKQA executive R&D director Tim Devine has a chat about what this means for the future of art.

AI for an eye

Lauren Vasey, research associate and doctoral candidate at the Institute for Computational Design at the University of Stuttgart, chats about the role artificial intelligence and machines are playing in design - and how the construction industry is poised for a rapid disruption.

AI for an eye

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, wearables, VR and other emerging technologies hold exciting possibilities for the marketing and insights space. In pondering how to pragmatically pursue these possibilities, we should take a humancentric look at how these technologies (and those not even thought of yet) will be integrated into the everyday lives of the people who buy our products. Rather than utilising technology for technology’s sake, consider how we can tap into new behaviours born of technological adoption to make our business insights more meaningful and authentic.

Artificial good or evil

Technique, not technology, is needed to solve the ‘wicked problem’ of cyber security, says computer scientist and cryptography expert Dr Peter Gutmann.