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Businesses get behind International Women's Day

Businesses get behind International Women's Day

First celebrated in 1909, International Women's Day has become a global celebration. We take a look at what local brands are doing.

FCB New Zealand kicked off the day with an agency-wide breakfast event that covered the history of the day and women in advertising. It took a look at Shirley Polykoff’s work as a junior copywriter in the late 1950s followed by Ilon Specht in the 1970s, and their work and development with how women’s roles were depicted in beauty advertisements. It also included career stories, advice and what to be aware of, with a Q&A panel of FCB women including Fleur Head (managing director), Niki Pettifer (CFO), Sarah Beston (media director), Ruth Bradshaw (group account director), Jo Underdown (group account director) and Laura Platts (senior account manager).

The hope is all staff—men and women—will take note of how they think, act and use language around women, as well as being more aware.

Left to right: Sara Beston, Ruth Bradshaw, Fleur Head, Laura Platts, Niki Pettifer and Jo Underdown

Air New Zealand is taking the audience on a behind the scenes tour of what goes into getting its planes in the sky, to celebrate the 4,900 women that work for the company. It's also asked Kiwis to name their own inspiring woman.

Women’s Refuge New Zealand has taken the opportunity to draw attention to the fact many women experiencing economic abuse are unable to go to work because they can’t buy sanitary products. To help solve the issue, it’s partnered with Bon Certified Organic Tampons.

Unabashed feminist outlet Villainesse hosted an entire livestream on Facebook.

Auckland’s Mexicali Fresh restaurants are celebrating with some protest-like signage installed by Y brand. The signs recognised the importance of women, immigrants, people of colour and diversity, helping Mexicali Fresh to create a culture of inclusiveness and acceptance.

And when considering the restaurant chain’s origin it’s no surprise it’s willing to make a statement about women’s rights and equality. The family who started Mexicali Fresh immigrated to New Zealand from the United States and founder and CEO Cindy Buell is not only mother and grandmother but also an active organising and supporting groups like the recent Women’s March. Her two sons Tyler and Conor also work with the company and oversee the operations and marketing on a daily basis.

The New Zealand Herald released this video with information about some of the country’s most impressive women.

TVNZ is also putting the focus on some recognisable women in New Zealand.

And Karma Cola's made its show of support an international one, by celebrating Kadie Bao who is chief of Boma village where it sources its cola.

A version of this story first appeared at StopPress.