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Microsoft to rake in royalties from Samsung's Android devices

Microsoft to rake in royalties from Samsung's Android devices
Microsoft and Samsung have reached a cross-licensing agreement, a deal that means the company will receive royalties on every Android smartphone and tablet sold by Samsung going forward and potentially in retrospect.

Microsoft and Samsung have reached a cross-licensing agreement, a deal that means the company will receive royalties on every Android smartphone and tablet sold by Samsung going forward and potentially in retrospect.

Microsoft already has a licensing deal with HTC, which sells both Android and Windows Phone devices.

“Together with the license agreement signed last year with HTC, today’s agreement with Samsung means that the top two Android handset manufacturers in the United States have now acquired licenses to Microsoft’s patent portfolio,” Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith and IP lawyer Horacio Gutierrez said.

“These two companies together accounted for more than half of all Android phones sold in the US over the past year.”

The companies also agreed to cooperate on the development and marketing of Windows Phone.

“Microsoft and Samsung see the opportunity for dramatic growth in Windows Phone and we’re investing to make that a reality,” said Andy Lees, president of Microsoft's Windows Phone division.

The settlement is the latest development in a series of patent suits relating to the Android platform.

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