Close

Primary Industries

Leadership qualities can be innate – but can also be fostered in the right environment. For the future prosperity of New Zealand agriculture, a collaborative approach that identifies and develops a wide range of leaders will be vital.

New Zealand’s primary industries can learn from the success of the Olympic Games in developing collaborative behaviours to deliver a more successful future for our vital agribusiness economic sector.

Irrigation has always been vital to agriculture, but access to water, and ways to maximise its effectiveness, have changed over the years. Landcare Research soil scientist Dr Carolyn Hedley charts an irrigation evolution.

Over many decades a number of great New Zealanders have helped put the country’s primary industries on the global map. Today, the challenges are more complex and the competition greater, but the best leaders continue to be more than up to the job. As judged by Jacqueline Rowarth, Hamish Gow, and Vincent Heeringa, here are Primary’s Top 10 agri-business leaders

We have experienced, innovative and inspiring stewards of the country’s natural resources, but who will be the next generation of people to lead New Zealand’s primary sector to dizzying commercial heights? Well, we haven’t got a crystal ball, but our judges are pretty sure we’ll all be hearing a lot more about the following 10 folk in years to come.

Braden Crosby (30) is taking a trip to the wine regions of France next year, but it’ll be both work and play for the country’s most promising young wine maker. Braden, who works at Borthwick Estate in Carterton, has had a great year, nabbing the 2012 Markhams Young Viticulturist of the Year in August, and Horticulturalist of the Year in November, and placing second in the AGMARDT Innovation Award with a unique, multi-purpose frost fan.

The electronic ID tag system for cattle known as NAIT – soon to include deer - is live and mandatory, and uptake rates are high. But that’s not to say the system is without its hiccups – or its naysayers, reports Owen Poland.