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Summer 2019

Issue #70, Summer 2019

The Creativity Issue: With greater diversity comes greater creativity

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Best Awards

The first thing to know about creative digital agency Resn is they aren’t just famous in New Zealand. They’re renowned worldwide.But what are we saying? Anyone who knows anything about Aotearoa’s design community already knows what legends they are. Which is why it’s only fitting for global managing director and executive creative director Rik Campbell and Steve Le Marquand to win the John Britten Black Pin at the most recent Best Design Awards – because they are among the very best.

Best Awards

Serious question: is there such thing as a typographic accent? Something that speaks to our Aotearoa-ness and stands out amid a veritable sea of all sorts of typefaces evocative of almost anything and everything? The judges at the 2018 Best Awards decided yes, which is why the Purple Graphic Pin went to Alt Group and Klim Type Foundry for There is no such thing as a New Zealand typeface.

3D printing

3D printing has hit headlines for its many uses since its mainstream conception around a decade ago, but one field where it’s being used somewhat silently and to a huge advantage is medicine. A prime example of this is a New Zealand company designing 3D printed breast prostheses called myReflection. Anna Bradley-Smith talks to the founders of the product, who are helping women recover a sense of themselves after a mastectomy.

Emerging Talent

Not many 23-year-olds head up their own wholesale, plant-based food business, but most 23-year-olds aren’t like Hannah Mellsop. Thanks to a whole lot of work ethic and drive, the Mount Maunganui local has grown Real Rad Food, her business that creates plant-based slices and treats for cafés across New Zealand, from the ground up – and as she tells Araina Pereira, she’s just getting started.

Future thinking

Vend and OMGTech! Founder Vaughan Fergusson (formerly Rowsell) has gone and done something a little bit like the plot of the 2011 film and novel, We Bought a Zoo. In a new venture, Fergusson and his partner Zoe Timbrell have bought a 100-acre block of land in Raglan that houses the Karioi Lodge, a former outdoor education centre, that the pair will remake into an envirotech and innovation centre. The goal is to help the next generation of problem solvers tackle the world’s big, complex issues, while prove that creativity can spark anywhere – not just in New Zealand’s biggest cities. Here, Fergusson explains how the The Institute of Awesome was born from the thought, “how hard can it be?”

The Wool Challenge

At Idealog, we regularly celebrate our design community's brilliance. Admittedly, we also get a twisted sort of pleasure out of making our annual design challenge harder and harder each year – but that’s because we want to ensure the community continues to think outside the box. Thanks to our friends at Icebreaker, we sent out a box of very raw wool fibre to some talented humans in a range of design disciplines and tasked them with recreating an everyday object using wool. Here’s what advertising, design and digital agency Special Group came up with: a Merino typeface, and Port-a-Cloud, a portable cloud on a stick.

The Wool Challenge

At Idealog, we regularly celebrate our design community's brilliance. Admittedly, we also get a twisted sort of pleasure out of making our annual design challenge harder and harder each year – but that’s because we want to ensure the community continues to think outside the box. Thanks to our friends at Icebreaker, we sent out a box of very raw wool fibre to some talented humans in a range of design disciplines and tasked them with recreating an everyday object using wool. Here’s what interdisciplinary design studio Isthmus came up with – comfort felt.

The Wool Challenge

At Idealog, we regularly celebrate our design community's brilliance. Admittedly, we also get a twisted sort of pleasure out of making our annual design challenge harder and harder each year – but that’s because we want to ensure the community continues to think outside the box. Thanks to our friends at Icebreaker, we sent out a box of very raw wool fibre to some talented humans in a range of design disciplines and tasked them with recreating an everyday object using wool. Here’s what Virtuo came up with – a replacement for circuit boards, CarbonWool.

Wellbeing Month

When the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction report was released in December last year, it painted a grim picture. “New Zealand is experiencing a rising tide of mental distress and addiction,” it said. “The cost of poor mental wellbeing and addiction is high. It is a high cost to individuals, families and whānau, businesses and organisations, communities, government and the country as a whole.” While the spotlight has been shone on specific demographics, one sector that is also toiling under pressure is our creative industries. We all know the squeeze of creative work well: late nights, long hours, client demands, unrealistic deadlines, impostor syndrome, self-criticism. This, coupled with the sensitive disposition creative people tend to have, often creates an environment where mental health issues can flourish. However, these people also have a talent for communicating ideas at a time when New Zealand has a base-level awareness of the problem, but not a deeper understanding or the tools to fix it. In part two of a series, Elly Strang talks to the new wave of creators are coming up with inspiring solutions to confront our mental health problem head on.

Wellbeing Month

When the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction report was released in December last year, it painted a grim picture. “New Zealand is experiencing a rising tide of mental distress and addiction,” it said. “The cost of poor mental wellbeing and addiction is high. It is a high cost to individuals, families and whānau, businesses and organisations, communities, government and the country as a whole.” While the spotlight has been shone on specific demographics, one sector that is also toiling under pressure is our creative industries. We all know the squeeze of creative work well: late nights, long hours, client demands, unrealistic deadlines, impostor syndrome, self-criticism. This, coupled with the sensitive disposition creative people tend to have, often creates an environment where mental health issues can flourish. In part one of a series, Elly Strang looks at the scale of the mental health problem in New Zealand's creative industries.

The Wool Challenge

At Idealog, we regularly celebrate our design community's brilliance. Admittedly, we also get a twisted sort of pleasure out of making our annual design challenge harder and harder each year – but that’s because we want to ensure the community continues to think outside the box. Thanks to our friends at Icebreaker, we sent out a box of very raw wool fibre to some talented humans in a range of design disciplines and tasked them with recreating an everyday object using wool. Here’s what wool product company Naturesclip came up with – a replacement for bubble wrap, OceanWool.

Opinion

There may be good reason to be concerned about our young entrepreneurs. Millennials and Generation Z have been labelled generation burn-out, generation snowflake and described as narcissistic, entitled, tech-dependent and fragile. They’re also oversaturated with headlines about the raft of issues like climate change they have to tackle, plus concerns about the impact of technology and social media on their mental health. Jennifer Young explores possible reasons why the younger generation is so anxious, as well as what young founders can do to avoid burn-out.

Elevator Pitch, brought to you by Flick

We gave Angus Brown a little longer than an elevator ride to pitch Ārepa, a caffeine-free mental clarity drink that has ingredients derived from New Zealand-sourced pine and blackcurrants.

The Wool Challenge

At Idealog, we regularly celebrate our design community's brilliance. Admittedly, we also get a twisted sort of pleasure out of making our annual design challenge harder and harder each year – but that’s because we want to ensure the community continues to think outside the box. Thanks to our friends at Icebreaker, we sent out a box of very raw wool fibre to some talented humans in a range of design disciplines and tasked them with recreating an everyday object using wool. Here’s what Papertowns Design Studio up with – a Wool Rugby Ball.

Changes afoot

Idealog is of the view that with diversity of experience and thought comes greater creativity – but don't just take our word for it. Design consultant, inaugural head of Better by Design and former head of design at NZTE Judith Thompson and design consultant, lecturer and strategist Jade Tang-Taylor take a look at why diversity in design is important, and highlight some great initiatives making Aotearoa New Zealand more diverse and inclusive.

The Wool Challenge

At Idealog, we regularly celebrate our design community's brilliance. Admittedly, we also get a twisted sort of pleasure out of making our annual design challenge harder and harder each year – but that’s because we want to ensure the community continues to think outside the box. Thanks to our friends at Icebreaker, we sent out a box of very raw wool fibre to some talented humans in a range of design disciplines and tasked them with recreating an everyday object using wool. Here’s what furniture designer David Trubridge up with – a lantern made of wool and hemp.

Wellbeing Month

Cities are systems in which the people are meant to thrive, but Isthmus creative director David Irwin says the design of them is instead accentuating many of the human ailments, such as stress, anxiety and depression. Here, he outlines how using a human-centric approach in urban design can support the needs of a modern world.

Creativity Month

Business is an inherently creative pursuit: ideas are had, actions are taken, experiments are conducted, failures occur, and the cycle continues. But while cultivating a great idea is one thing, how do you ensure the idea has legs to be commercialised? We sat down with advertising legend, Mike Hutcheson, to figure out just that.

Idealog + ICG

A recent advertisement by Gillette discussing toxic masculinity divided critics over whether it created meaningful change, or was just virtue signalling by one of the world’s largest razor brands. ICG strategy director Marcus Hawkin-Adams breaks down how to navigate the tricky marketing waters of championing a social cause.

The Wool Challenge

At Idealog, we regularly celebrate our design community's brilliance. Admittedly, we also get a twisted sort of pleasure out of making our annual design challenge harder and harder each year – but that’s because we want to ensure the community continues to think outside the box. Thanks to our friends at Icebreaker, we sent out a box of very raw wool fibre to some talented humans in a range of design disciplines and tasked them with recreating an everyday object using wool. Here’s what digital agency Method came up with – an interactive wallpaper, Woolpaper.

Idealog + Special Group

Creativity is at the heart of everything award-winning independent creative company Special Group does. From campaigns to brand-building, Special Group has always been about stripping down silos and layers in the aid of creativity for business. Executive creative director and partner Tony Bradbourne discusses how the agency integrates this through every part of their business.

Gratuitous self-promotion

The 2019 Creativity issue of Idealog is out now, and it's a celebration of our special brand of New Zealand creativity, as well as the power of design. The overall theme of the magazine is diversity of thought and experience leads to greater creativity, and this issue features stories on a company 3D printing breast prosthetics for cancer survivors, an exploration of mental health within the creative industries, what constitutes good UX design, interviews with people responsible for Auckland city's metamorphosis, a look at the different initiatives promoting diversity in design, and much, much more. In the spirit of gratuitous self-promotion, read on for a full breakdown of what you can expect in the latest issue.