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Where giants roam the landscape...

There’s nothing like a meddling mass of metal in the form of a power pylon to create a blight on the landscape. Enter Boston-based  Choi+Shine Architects, “A practice of thoughtful design”. Thoughtful indeed as these adapted pylons show. The pylons, designed by Jin Choi and Thomas Shine, have been proposed for the Icelandic landscape, and require only small alterations to the existing pylon design.  

“Making only minor alterations to well established steel-framed tower design, we have created a series of towers that are powerful, solemn and variable. These iconic pylon-figures will become monuments in the landscape. Seeing the pylon-figures will become an unforgettable experience, elevating the towers to something more than merely a functional design of necessity,” say the architects on their website. 

The 150 foot high giants, built with steel, glass and concrete, aren’t restricted to just one stance either. As the environment changes, so do the figures. As the lines move up the hill, the stance changes to that of someone climbing. And over long spans, the pylon-figure stretches to gain increased height, crouches for increased strength or strains under the weight of the wires. 

The head and feet of the giants can also be altered to create a sense of “place”. And the figures can also be designed to appear to be walking in the same direction or opposite directions, looking at each other and even kneeling. 

“Despite the large number of possible forms, each pylon-figure is made from the same major assembled parts (torso, fore arm, upper leg, hand etc.) and uses a library of pre-assembled joints between these parts to create the pylon-figures’ appearance. This design allows for many variations in form and height while the pylon-figures’ cost is kept low through identical production, simple assembly and construction.” 

The proposal is so good, it received an honourable mention in 2008 at the Icelandic High-Voltage Electrical Pylon International Design Competition and this year, was one of four winning project for the Boston Society of Architects ‘2010 Unbuilt Awards’. 

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