Money isn't everything, according to today's job seekers

Money isn't everything, according to today's job seekers
These days, salary is often one of the last things on a typical job seeker's mind.

  These days, salary is often one of the last things on a typical job seeker's mind.

A Robert Walters survey of 700-plus professionals (and 300-plus hiring managers) found that a third choose to leave their roles when they no longer feel challenged, with the working environment and potential for advancement being the next most important factors.

The results - spelled out in a white paper, The Exit Process: How to Gain Valuable Insights to Build a Better Workplace - show that while employers know stagnation is one of the reasons that leads employees to resign, not all are aware that it is the top concern.

It's therefore more important than ever to set out a clear path for progression, recognise good performance, and deliver challenging work to keep staff engaged.

"Setting achievable yet challenging KPIs is vital to ensuring employees feel valued, challenged and engaged, as well as making the day-to-day business run more efficiently. Managers can work with employees to develop KPIs that are suited to the individual, but effective KPIs are usually ones that are strategic, relevant to the role, realistic to achieve and measurable or quantifiable," the study concludes.

Further education and training are also highly prized, and can be mutually beneficial to boot.

Interestingly, the overwhelming majority of employers reckon they can predict impending resignations through lateness, attitudes or increased absences - as well as stating that they encourage employees to come to them with any problems before deciding to look elsewhere.

And half of those surveyed said they would give a heads up to their bosses if they were unhappy, out of respect for the company.

How does this gel with your experiences in the workplace?