'Learn to code' is not the answer

'Learn to code' is not the answer
While popular theory might have you believe otherwise, learning to code is not the only career option for the future. Instead, Sean Blanda turns to economist Tyler Cowen to explain what you DO need to thrive in tomorrow's world.

While popular theory might have you believe otherwise, learning to code is not the only career option for the future. Instead, Sean Blanda of 99u turns to economist Tyler Cowen to explain what you DO need to thrive in tomorrow's world.

A few salient points: 

Learn to work with technology

If becoming a programmer is actually your buzz, fantastic. But if not, forcing yourself into coding for the sake of it is not the answer.

Cowen reckons focusing on any one hard skill is an outmoded way of thinking, as the demand for skills can shift constantly. Strategic know-how and soft skills round out the package.

"The smartest workers will be able to leverage technology to their advantage and be able to recognise the big-picture ways to utilise it. The technology will change. The means of accessing will change. But strategically implementing it will remain in constant demand for tomorrow’s workforce." 

Learn to lead and collaborate

First-rate leadership cannot be outsourced. In the same vein, learning to market yourself is vital. Success still relies on getting yourself noticed, which is set to only get harder in the coming years.

Everything will be transparent – and measurable

The rise of automation means that everything we do can and will become measureable, as anyone who works in digital knows.

Cowen says the resulting “hyper meritocracy,” means we'll always know where we stack up, leading to inevitable comparisons with our peers – and yes, the accompanying pressure.

The upshot? Your choice will become ever clearer: Will you “live to work,” and do whatever it takes to climb to the top of the rankings? Or will you "work to live" and focus on maximising your leisure time?

Read the full post over at 99u.