Aussie office building rating scheme making its way to NZ

Aussie office building rating scheme making its way to NZ
Work is underway to develop a scheme to measure and rate the energy performance of New Zealand office buildings, based on a similar model overseas.

Work is underway to develop a scheme to measure and rate the energy performance of New Zealand office buildings, based on a similar model overseas.

Based on the successful National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS), the scheme will be introduced in New Zealand by EECA Business and delivered by the New Zealand Green Building Council (NZGBC) in mid 2013.

NABERSNZ will measure and rate energy performance on a scale of one to six stars. A five star rating is considered market leading performance with a typical office building likely to rate between 2.5 and three stars.

Assessors will use 12 months of energy use data, and take into account building area, location, computer density, and hours of operation to rate performance.

EECA chief executive Mike Underhill says commercial building owners and tenants have shown a lot of interest in the scheme.

“By looking at a NABERSNZ rating owners and tenants can see how well a building or tenancy is performing, and get an indication of likely energy costs,” he said.

NZGBC chief executive Alex Cutler called it "the most exciting development in commercial green building ratings in New Zealand since the launch of the Green Star tool in 2007".

She said the scheme is now in a pilot phase with 11 NABERSNZ assessors trained and working on pilot assessments that represent a cross-section of New Zealand office buildings.

EECA Business commercial programme manager Karen Chaney said there are significant opportunities to improve the energy performance of commercial buildings, mainly in improved efficiency of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting systems.

“The key to meeting these needs is through the introduction of a widely recognised energy performance rating that can be easily understood and communicated."