Generation C cover story, and I have just completed our Auckland and Wellington Gen C seminars. Interestingly, no ...">Generation C cover story, and I have just completed our Auckland and Wellington Gen C seminars. Interestingly, no ..." />Generation C cover story, and I have just completed our Auckland and Wellington Gen C seminars. Interestingly, no ...">
Close

How does Gen C help Me?

Jake Pearce, the author of our Generation C cover story, and I have just completed our Auckland and Wellington Gen C seminars. Interestingly, no one really questioned our assumptions or that marketing to Gen C was necessary. Just tell us how, was the response.

Good question and much harder to answer than saying it’s important and you should do it.

We brainstormed a few ideas this morning and here are three tools for you to start the process.

First, ask yourself, how would Trade Me do this? One person from the TAB asked how to do Gen C gambling. Well, how might Trade Me attack gambling? For a start it might throw the problem of what to gamble on back to the punters. Instead of offering a limited number of events such as a Super 14 game or a horse race to bet on, why not ask punters to put up their own dares, games and scenarios. Imagine it as taking online what happens every Friday down at your local tavern between drinking buddies.

Second, provide a platform for people’s stories. Someone else this morning asked how use Gen C techniques for selling the idea of environmental management. How about providing a website for green campaigners to post their digi-films and reports about local environmental problems? Think about it as reality TV: real green disasters in your neighbourhood! You can just imagine how the name and shame approach would generate response. Alternatively, give people a place to report on their local green initiatives such as a tree-planting project or a creek clean up. And don’t be all journalistic and authoritative about it. Just host these things and let the fans do the work.

Third, monetise what you love. Just across from me this morning in Wellington is the founder of the most trafficked drum and bass site in the country, Bass Drop. What started as a free listing service for event managers has turned into a huge D&B fan site that pays for itself while Andrew, the founder, works his day job. Fans keep the site updated with content and Andrew is now looking for brand extensions.

There are plenty of examples of Gen C marketing at work. Keep visiting our site to watch the phenomenon unfold. And hey, comment on this blog!