Skinny launches a wireless broadband service that is actually wireless

Skinny is giving a new meaning to wireless broadband and hopes New Zealanders will switch to the truly cableless service.

Skinny is giving a new meaning to wireless broadband and hopes New Zealanders will switch to the truly cableless service.

The mobile company launched its broadband service below-the-line in December, targeting their pre-existing Skinny Mobile customers but now the general public has become the target market for the new broadband service.

However, you won’t see any TVCs for the campaign. Brand manager Ally Young says Skinny Mobile hasn’t been on TV for the last year, opting instead for digital, cinema, radio, direct comms and out-of-home advertising.

“We are a smaller company so we generally don’t have a huge marketing spend, the TVC is an expensive way of spending up all your money. We made the decision not to go on TV and decided we needed to get our dynamic message across somehow, that’s why we’ve put it into cinema and YouTube,” Young says.

Creative agency The Collective is behind the campaign's video.

The broadband service operates on the Spark 4G network, which means users need no additional cables. Setup simply requires plugging in the power cord.

Young says the appeal lies in not having to wait for a technician to get a connection to access the internet. 

Skinny has priced its deal at $55 for 60GB, and Young says this is more than sufficient for most households. 

“The average household will use about 45GB, so 60GB it’s good for ‘low user value seekers’.”

She also says the service is generally faster than ADSL but slower than fibre.

Though the campaign is aimed at the mass market, Young points out the easy setup will appeal to students, a target market for Skinny since the beginning.

It has also given the mobile company a new niche market, as the service will be particularly helpful for people who live on boats.

“They use data which is expensive and the marina WiFi is often far away from where the boat is berthed and the signal isn’t that great. This gives them a solid experience and a good connection,” Young says.

Originally published on StopPress