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Review: Philips Sonicare AirFloss

Review: Philips Sonicare AirFloss

Personally, I rank flossing up there with cleaning floor grout on the fun scale (about minus eleven). Both fall into the things-I-should-really-do-but-never-got-into-the-habit-of category.

review philips sonicare airfloss

The Philips Sonicare AirFloss seems to have been made expressly with slobs like me in mind. Forget sawing between your molars with a piece of string; now you can ride the new wave of pressurised air to squeaky clean teeth.

The Sonicare Airfloss resembles a toothbrush, but instead of bristles, a small head ejects pressurised microdroplets of liquid to remove plaque.

Using it really only involves the following steps:

* Push the power button. It will glow green.

* Point the Sonicare AirFloss between two of your teeth (you'll find the tip settles along the groove in your gum line)

* Press the top button to activate it. Water or mouthwash (depending on what you've filled it with) will blast out with a satisfying hiss. (Amusingly, the Philips website says pushing the button requires approximately the same force as clicking a computer mouse button, which is pretty spot on.)

While you can't adjust the level of force, I had no problems with it – gentle enough not to hurt, but definitely impactful.

The Sonicare AirFloss retails for about $200, holds two teaspoons of water/mouthwash (enough for two full uses) and will blast through your whole mouth in under a minute. In tests, it was found to remove significantly more plaque compared with brushing alone – though I haven't seen studies directly comparing it with manual floss.

The one downside is it may not feel particularly effective as you go, particularly as you don't get that satisfying feeling of physically burrowing between teeth that you do with a piece of floss. But (shamefully) I've never fully incorporated floss into my daily routine, where I could easily see this fitting into my life.