Close

The holy spirit of file-sharing

File-sharing, the scourge of Hollywood, is now an officially-recognised religion.

Sweden sanctioned the Church of Kopimism just before Christmas, giving it legitimate status.

For the Church of Kopimism, information is holy and copying is a sacrament.

According to its website, which is temporarily down due to an influx of traffic from Slashdot:

"Information holds a value, in itself and in what it contains, and the value multiplies through copying. Therefore, copying is central for the organisation and its members."

The Church of Kopimism has been trying to get registered as a bona fide religious organisation for more than a year, applying three times.

"I think it might have something to do with the governmental organisations abiding by a very copyright-friendly attitude, with a twisted view on copying," says church chairman Gustav Nipe.

The movement has its roots in 2010, formed by student Isak Gerson, who is its "spiritual leader". The church describes itself as "formalising" a community, yet there is no formal membership. Rather, you just have to feel the calling.

The church organises kopyactings - religious services - where the kopimists share information with each other through copying and remix.

"Being recognised by the state of Sweden is a large step for all of kopimi. Hopefully, this is one step towards the day when we can live out our faith without fear of persecution," says Gerson.

If file-sharing is your jam, you can call yourself a member of the church, too. The organization states it doesn’t have any formal initiation process or membership requirements; “you just have to feel a calling to worship what is the holiest of the holiest, information and copy,” reads the church’s website.

The Church of Kopimism’s services are called kopyactings. In these going-on, celebrants share files and remix to their hearts’ content.

Now if only BitTorrent clients could be recognized as a holy sacrament, we’d all have a bit less to worry about.