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InternetNZ calls for broadband innovation centre, copyright law reform

InternetNZ calls for broadband innovation centre, copyright law reform
Ahead of an upcoming election debate on IT next week, InternetNZ has issued a discussion document calling for a "shared, common vision" for New Zealand's digital future.

Ahead of an upcoming election debate on IT next week, InternetNZ has issued a discussion document calling for a "shared, common vision" for New Zealand's digital future.

Future: Digital – A discussion starter on priorities for a future Governmentraises a range of key issues, including:

- copyright law reform

- green data centres

- more funding for local content

- stepping up R&D spending

- developing and attracting high-end talent

- the publication of all Official Information Act requests, responses and material released online

- a 'Centre for Broadband Innovation' to maximise the potential of the UFB rollout

“Future: Digital is about the need for a shared, common vision for where New Zealand will be in 10 to 20 years time,"  Internet NZ chief executive Vikram Kumar said.

"The economic opportunity is for high growth, exports, jobs, productivity, wages, returns and prosperity. The social, cultural, environmental and government impacts are profound. All elements have to be woven together to form a fabric of fundamental change.

“The time has come for us all to embrace the technological and social change occurring, or be consigned to ignorance and missed opportunities."

The paper has been released ahead of a political debate that InternetNZ will host on October 18 in Wellington, to be streamed live online, with Steven Joyce (National), Clare Curran (Labour), Gareth Hughes (Green) and Peter McCaffrey (ACT) participating.

At NetVision 2011, each of the party representatives will outline their visions across economic, social, cultural, environmental and government perspectives.

“The Internet marks a step change in New Zealand’s access to markets, people and knowledge," Kumar said.

"One challenge for political parties and the public is to think about the opportunities and challenges comprehensively to drive fundamental change rather than compartmentalise it as 'ICT portfolio' issues."