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Technology Month, brought to you by Springload

Milk without the cow, meatless burgers that bleed, chicken and shrimp made from plant matter, and now foie gras without a force-fed goose in sight. A new food revolution enabled by science and biotech is brewing and, if it succeeds, animals will have little to do with the future of food. For some, that future looks rosy, but, as Dr. Rosie Bosworth writes in a series, the implications for New Zealand’s agricultural sector could be less than palatable.

Technology Month, brought to you by Springload

Milk without the cow, meatless burgers that bleed, chicken and shrimp made from plant matter, and now foie gras without a force-fed goose in sight. A new food revolution enabled by science and biotech is brewing and, if it succeeds, animals will have little to do with the future of food. For some, that future looks rosy, but, as Dr. Rosie Bosworth writes in part three of a series, the implications for New Zealand’s agricultural sector could be less than palatable.

The great food disruption

Milk without the cow, meatless burgers that bleed, chicken and shrimp made from plant matter, and now foie gras without a force-fed goose in sight. A new food revolution enabled by science and biotech is brewing and, if it succeeds, animals will have little to do with the future of food. For some, that future looks rosy, but, as Dr. Rosie Bosworth writes in part three of a series, the implications for New Zealand’s agricultural sector could be less than palatable. 

Technology Month, brought to you by Springload

Milk without the cow, meatless burgers that bleed, chicken and shrimp made from plant matter, and now foie gras without a force-fed goose in sight. A new food revolution enabled by science and biotech is brewing and, if it succeeds, animals will have little to do with the future of food. For some, that future looks rosy, but, as Dr. Rosie Bosworth writes in part two of a series, the implications for New Zealand’s agricultural sector could be less than palatable. 

Technology Month, brought to you by Springload

Milk without the cow, meatless burgers that bleed, chicken and shrimp made from plant matter, and now foie gras without a force-fed goose in sight. A new food revolution enabled by science and biotech is brewing and, if it succeeds, animals will have little to do with the future of food. For some, that future looks rosy, but, as Dr. Rosie Bosworth writes in part one of a series, the implications for New Zealand’s agricultural sector could be less than palatable.

Wish we'd thought of that

New Zealand is known as a nation of innovation. And that innovation trickles down to the very stuff we eat and drink. Do you have a comestible-related creation that you think deserves to be recognised at the 2017 New Zealand Innovation Awards? Then enter it in the Innovation in Food and Beverage category, sponsored by Plant & Food Research.

They were the best of times for meat prices, but by the end of 2012 they were the worst of times, with losses all around for a sector struggling to keep its earnings consistent. Are contracts between farmers and processors the key to consistency, asks Owen Poland?

Mary has a little lamb—now what? The answer used to be simple: slaughter it, sling it in a muslin bag and then ship it ‘home’ to Mother England. But how times have changed. And we've had to change with them .