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Art

All natural

Artist Andrew Steel and photographer Matt Quérée have come together to create a photography series called BodyLandscape, which features 20 women in the nude painted to merge with the landscape behind them. But there’s more to this series than meets the eye: It was a showcase of diversity of ethnicities and body shapes, while for others, it was a way of claiming their body back after a traumatic experience. Here, the pair talk how the concept came to life.

Embellish

Auckland artist Emma Bass, whose photographic work “Hydrangeas 8.50 am” from her Imperfect series was selected for the Summer Exhibition at the 2016 Royal Academy in London, has embarked on a fresh new path.  And it was her visit to that capital city that planted the seed – pun quite possibly intended.

Follow nobody

Kiwi art retailer and print specialist Endemic World has produced a series of gently satirical prints in celebration of a decade in business. Its new gallery art print series includes four graphic posters designed by the Endemic World team “for the art critic within”.

Technology Month, brought to you by Springload

What happens when you combine water, electricity and a form of art? The Waterlight Grafitti installation. The interactive piece, which will be in Aotea Square for the month of August, is a collision between a natural element – water – and technology – LED lights, allowing people to create lit-up, non-permanent grafitti using liquid.

Better by design

New Zealand has galleries a plenty to frequent when it comes to showcasing visual art, but the work of architects and other design disciplines have been underserved ­– until now, with Objectspace. And with national conversations around urban planning and housing a hot topic, its expansion couldn’t be more timely. We chatted with director Kim Paton about her vision for the gallery’s new space.

Little people, big feelings

It’s no secret that Aotearoa has the highest youth suicide rate in the developed world, with initiatives to solve this being hotly debated. Friends and creative minds Jenny Palmer and Evie Kemp hope their new book, Feel a Little, will lay the groundwork early on teaching the younger generation it’s okay to feel and speak up about their emotions.